Welcome

Celebrating Over 75 Years Of Service

The American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) represents over 2,700 Board-certified otolaryngologists and health care providers. Otolaryngology, frequently referred to as Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT), uniquely combines medical and surgical expertise to care for patients with a variety of conditions affecting the ears, nose, and throat, as well as commonly related conditions. AAOA members devote part of their practice to the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease. The AAOA actively supports its membership through education, research, and advocacy in the care of allergic patients.

"Dedicated to enhancing knowledge and skill in the care of the allergic patient."

ADVOCACY UPDATES

USP Update

Final Standards for Allergen Extract Compounding under USP Chapter 797 The long-awaited new USP Chapter…

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Impact OF 2019 Physician Fee Schedule on Allergy and Sinus Services

Specialty Impact The conversion factor for 2019 will be $36.0391 and remains essentially flat.  The changes…

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Your AAOA at the AMA

I want to urge you to consider membership in the AMA because your membership in…

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Changes in MACRA

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Before the close of 2017, all physicians must take action to avoid the 4 percent cut that will be assessed in 2019 for not participating in the new Quality Payment Program (QPP) authorized by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA).  Read More

CMS Announces Changes in MACRA Implementation Timeline. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced major changes to the implementation of the Medicare Access and CHIP Re-authorization (MACRA).
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Upcoming Dates

07/31/19: Membership Application Deadline to be voted in at the 2019 Annual Meeting and to be eligible for AAOA Member Rate (FREE) for the 2019 Annual Meeting
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12/01/19: Research Grant Cycle
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04/01/20: Fellow Exam Application Deadline
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06/01/20: Research Grant Cycle
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06/01/20: Call For Scientific Abstracts Deadline
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06/7/20: Membership Application Deadline to be eligible for AAOA Member rate for the 2020 Basic Course

EDUCATION

New Orleans: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Much like the Clash song lyrics, many of you will flip through this AAOA Today issue trying to assess whether it is worth the cost to get on a plane to participate in the AAOA’s Annual Meeting. We recognize you have lots of CME options, some are even competing with our meeting in New Orleans. Read More

IFAR

IFAR Impact Factor: 2.454

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Now Available

Changes in Managing Practices

Mission

Working together with AAOA staff, volunteer leadership and members will enable us to have a positive impact on our members’ practices.

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Live and Online CME

2019 AAOA Annual Meeting
September 13-15 | New Orleans, LA
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2019 Advanced Course in Allergy & Immunology
December 12-14 | Austin, TX
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2020 Basic Course in Allergy & Immunology
July 9-11 | Orlando, FL
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AAOA Clinical Insights
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PATIENT CORNER

Off to College: Tips for Managing Allergies

Heading to college is an exciting time. What are the best ways for students to avoid exacerbation of their symptoms as they enter the hallowed halls of higher learning?

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College Allergy Symptoms Treatment Back to Shcool

News and Updates

New Orleans: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Much like the Clash song lyrics, many of you will flip through this AAOA Today…

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International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology Top Articles 2018-2019

Read top articles published in the International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology 2018-2019. Most Cited International Consensus…

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CEO Update – Re·im·ag·ine

re·im·ag·ineverb reinterpret (an event, work of art, etc) imaginatively; rethink Reimagined, Reinvented, Reinvigorated….these are all…

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My allergy testing is negative but I still have symptoms.

What should I do?

My allergy testing is negative but I still have symptoms. What should I do?
You suffer through every spring, sneezing and coughing, with pressure in your ears and your eyes are so itchy you’d rather keep them closed!

Your allergist did a blood test, including up to 40 ‘common’ allergens in your region and it was NEGATIVE!!

“Unbelievable!” Your Doctor tells you that you don’t have allergies, but you know that something is wrong. What can you do?

Explore your history: what triggers your symptoms? Think about whether they are worse indoors or outdoors, which seasons, foods, and exposures (pets, mold, dust, etc). Try environmental controls: take measures to reduce exposure to the most common offenders. A few recommended actions include reducing exposure to pet dander, use of HEPA air purifier, wash bed linens in hot water weekly to address dust mites. Avoid foods that seem to trigger your symptoms. For additional measures, discuss with your allergist.

Can I take allergy medicine anyway?

Some patients do not have allergy that will show up on a blood test, even though they experience symptoms when exposed to certain triggers. Sometimes the allergic response is limited to the eyes, ears, and/or nasal and sinus membranes. Despite negative testing, it is a true allergic response and may respond to allergy medications as well as immunotherapy.

The most commonly used medications for allergy are antihistamines, because histamine is released in the body in response to allergic triggers. Speak with your doctor about what might be appropriate for you to treat your symptoms.

Should I get retested?

Two years between allergy tests is reasonable – there are no limitations to the frequency of testing. Skin tests may be more sensitive than blood tests, though both methods are considered accurate for diagnosing allergies. You can talk with your allergist about whether retesting is necessary.

Most importantly, don’t give up just because you have negative testing. Speak with your provider about how to potentially address the symptoms you are still having.