Welcome

Celebrating Over 75 Years Of Service

The American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) represents over 2,700 Board-certified otolaryngologists and health care providers. Otolaryngology, frequently referred to as Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT), uniquely combines medical and surgical expertise to care for patients with a variety of conditions affecting the ears, nose, and throat, as well as commonly related conditions. AAOA members devote part of their practice to the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease. The AAOA actively supports its membership through education, research, and advocacy in the care of allergic patients.

"Dedicated to enhancing knowledge and skill in the care of the allergic patient."

ADVOCACY UPDATES

Breaking News on USP Chapter 797

An updated draft of USP Chapter 797 was released today. Updated Chapter 797 Posted for Public Comment: Separate Requirements…

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Congress Makes Changes to MACRA

The second year of the Quality Payment Program (QPP) authorized by the Medicare Access and…

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CMS Extends the MIPS 2017 Data Submission Deadline from March 31 to April 3 at 8 PM EDT

If you’re an eligible clinician participating in the Quality Payment Program, you now have until Tuesday, April 3,…

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Changes in MACRA

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Before the close of 2017, all physicians must take action to avoid the 4 percent cut that will be assessed in 2019 for not participating in the new Quality Payment Program (QPP) authorized by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA).  Read More

CMS Announces Changes in MACRA Implementation Timeline. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced major changes to the implementation of the Medicare Access and CHIP Re-authorization (MACRA).
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Upcoming Dates

06/01/2018: Research Grant Cycle

12/01/2018: Research Grant Cycle
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06/15/18: Membership Application Deadline to be eligible for AAOA Member rate for the 2018 Basic Course

07/31/18: Membership Application Deadline to be voted in at the 2018 Annual Meeting and to be eligible for AAOA Member Rate (FREE) for the 2018 Annual Meeting
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04/01/2019: 2019 Fellow Exam Application Deadline
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EDUCATION

Why attend the 2018 AAOA Annual Meeting in Philadelphia from September 14-16? Learn some of the reasons to attend from the AAOA Leadership and staff. Register

Different Advanced Course

What is it in today’s otolaryngology practice that is resonating as a hot topic? Where are the novel treatment strategies? What is today’s typical otolaryngology practice or more specifically the typical AAOA member’s practice?  These are the questions we try to address when building out our Advanced Course in Allergy & Immunology. Read More

Codes/Guidelines

CMS Announces Changes in MACRA Implementation Timeline. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced major changes to the implementation of the Medicare Access and CHIP Re-authorization (MACRA).
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IFAR

Editor in Chief Search
The ARS-AAOA IFAR LLC is pleased to announce its search for Editor in Chief, term beginning April 2020. Read More

IFAR Impact Factor: 2.135

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Now Available

Changes in Managing Practices

Mission

Working together with AAOA staff, volunteer leadership and members will enable us to have a positive impact on our members’ practices.

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Live and Online CME

2018 AAOA Annual Meeting
September 14-16 | Philadelphia, PA
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2018 Advanced Course in Allergy & Immunology
December 6-8 | Atlanta, GA
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AAOA Clinical Insights
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PATIENT CORNER

Avoidance

The first most basic treatment step, once an allergen has been identified, is to eliminate or avoid contact with it, if possible. Unfortunately, avoiding some allergens (such as dust, molds, and animals) is often difficult and thus allergen avoidance alone may not be effective.

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News and Updates

Social and Networking Events at the 2018 AAOA Annual Meeting

This year’s Annual Meeting assures to be not only educational, interactive, and practice-centered, but also…

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2018 AAOA Annual Meeting – Important Dates

August 14 - Hotel Discounted Rate Deadline Room Rate Room rate is $219 (plus 15.5% tax) single/double…

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Burnout: A Real Problem, Not Just a Trendy Talk Show Topic

When you really look at hot topics in medicine, physician burnout seems to really skyrocket…

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Healthcare

Future of the Affordable Care Act Up in the Air

On the campaign trail, President Trump said his top healthcare priority would be to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). His replacement proposals included allowing insurers to sell policies across state lines; making premiums fully tax deductible; expanding the availability of Health Savings Accounts; allowing the importation of drugs from other countries; and capping the employer tax exclusion for health plan coverage. According to a Rand study, Trump’s proposals could cost as much as $41 billion, depending upon which proposals were enacted.

GOP congressional leaders have also set their sights on ACA repeal and replace as a top priority this year, and have already set the process to repeal the bill in motion.  We anticipate they will use a 2015 bill that was passed and subsequently vetoed by former President Obama as a framework. That bill repealed the individual and employer mandates, and ended ACA’s subsidy programs, including premium tax credits, cost-sharing reduction payments and small business tax credits.

GOP leaders relied on a legislative tool to proceed with the repeal, called budget reconciliation, which only requires a simple majority vote in the Senate, to repeal selected provisions of the law. Under this approach, congressional committees have been tasked with writing the repeal legislation, then the full Congress will vote. The final version of the bill, which has not been completed, will most likely postpone the effective date for repeal to allow Congress sufficient time to come up with an alternative to ACA.

On January 18, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released a detailed report laying out the implications of repealing the ACA. The CBO’s report states that repealing the law would result in an estimated 18 million people losing health insurance in 2018, with that number rising to an estimated 32 million by 2026. Repeal—without a comprehensive replacement in place—would also result in health insurance premiums spiking 20-25 percent over the next year, according to CBO.

In the meantime, Senate Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has called for patience while a replacement plan is developed, and President Trump said he would prefer to keep some major elements of the law—allowing adult children to remain on their parents’ plans until age 26 and prohibiting pre-existing condition exclusions.

However, shortly after being inaugurated, President Trump signed his first executive order which concerned the ACA.  It directs federal agencies “to the maximum extent permitted by law” to relax policies that impose burdens on individuals, insurers, hospitals, doctors and pharmaceutical companies and to give greater flexibility to states.  Because of the complexity of the law, it is difficult to anticipate what changes the agencies will make as a result.

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