Welcome

Celebrating Over 75 Years Of Service

The American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) represents over 2,700 Board-certified otolaryngologists and health care providers. Otolaryngology, frequently referred to as Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT), uniquely combines medical and surgical expertise to care for patients with a variety of conditions affecting the ears, nose, and throat, as well as commonly related conditions. AAOA members devote part of their practice to the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease. The AAOA actively supports its membership through education, research, and advocacy in the care of allergic patients.

"Dedicated to enhancing knowledge and skill in the care of the allergic patient."

ADVOCACY UPDATES

Changes in MACRA

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Before the close of 2017, all physicians must take action to avoid the 4 percent cut that will be assessed in 2019 for not participating in the new Quality Payment Program (QPP) authorized by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA).  Read More

CMS Announces Changes in MACRA Implementation Timeline. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced major changes to the implementation of the Medicare Access and CHIP Re-authorization (MACRA).
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Upcoming Dates

12/01/19: Research Grant Cycle
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04/01/20: Fellow Exam Application Deadline
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06/01/20: Research Grant Cycle
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06/01/20: Call For Scientific Abstracts Deadline
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06/26/20: Membership Application Deadline to be eligible for AAOA Member rate for the 2020 Basic Course

09/11/20: Membership Application Deadline to be voted in at the 2020 Annual Meeting and to be eligible for AAOA Member Rate (FREE) for the 2020 Annual Meeting Learn more

EDUCATION

New Orleans: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Much like the Clash song lyrics, many of you will flip through this AAOA Today issue trying to assess whether it is worth the cost to get on a plane to participate in the AAOA’s Annual Meeting. We recognize you have lots of CME options, some are even competing with our meeting in New Orleans. Read More

IFAR

IFAR Impact Factor: 2.454

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Now Available

Changes in Managing Practices

Mission

Working together with AAOA staff, volunteer leadership and members will enable us to have a positive impact on our members’ practices.

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Live and Online CME

2019 AAOA Annual Meeting
September 13-15 | New Orleans, LA
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2019 Advanced Course in Allergy & Immunology
December 12-14 | Austin, TX
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2020 Basic Course in Allergy & Immunology
July 9-11 | Orlando, FL
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AAOA Clinical Insights
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PATIENT CORNER

Off to College: Tips for Managing Allergies

Heading to college is an exciting time. What are the best ways for students to avoid exacerbation of their symptoms as they enter the hallowed halls of higher learning?

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College Allergy Symptoms Treatment Back to Shcool

News and Updates

Practice Management

Strategies & Tactics to Improve Efficiencies for Better Patient Care In response to member feedback, we…

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ReCAP — Review Of Core Allergy Principles

The AAOA Education Committee is pleased to announce that, in addition to updating the format and educational venue…

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NEW! Windy City Tours: Content Meets Culture – Conversations with Experts 

In an effort to maximize educational value, content, and time, the AAOA Education Committee has…

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Menu

A Brief History of Allergy Treatment

The history of modern allergy treatment dates back to the early decades of the twentieth century with the demonstration of decreased response to grass pollens following conjunctival challenge done by Noon and Freeman.  These techniques were subsequently modified that led to the development of subcutaneous introduction of allergens or subcutaneous immunothearpy (SCIT). Sublingual immunotherapy was first pioneered in the 1940s. In 2014, the FDA approved commercially prepared sublingual therapies for grass and ragweed.

Antihistamines were developed in the 1930s and became clinically available in the 1940s.  Second generations antihistamines were approved in mid-1980s providing relief of symptoms with decreased central nervous system side effects.

Corticosteroid nasal sprays were reportedly used as early as 1950s but did not gain prominent use until the 1970s with later generations improving patient tolerance and reducing impact on hypothalamic-pituitary axis.  In 2012 the release of a coformulated nasal spray with antihistamine and corticosteroid offered even greater efficacy.

Leukotrienes were discovered in the 1970s.   The discovery and introduction of Montelukast (Singulair) a decade later providing additional pharmacological management of inflammatory mediators.  

The most recent therapeutic introductions for allergy include monoclonal antibodies that are produced using recombinant DNA techniques.  These medications block IgE and various leukotrienes to eliminate or significantly ameliorate the inflammatory reaction.

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References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3651049/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4761089/
https://www.jacionline.org/article/S0091-6749(10)01853-1/pdf

Allergies for the Otolaryngologist; Ferguson,B.J. and Golla,S;l Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America; June 2011; Volume 44; Number 3

http://www.allergiesexplained.com/pages/Desensitisation%20or%20Immuno%20Therapy.htm